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Piper Aircraft

The BAE-14/28 turbo alternator is available for the following Piper Aircraft models: PA-28 & PA-32. The BPE-14 turbo alternator is available for these models: J3, PA-11, PA-15 & PA-18. For more information on the Piper Aircraft please use the links below.

Piper PA-28 | Piper PA-32 | Piper J-3 | Piper PA-11 | Piper PA-15 | Piper PA-18


Piper PA-28

Piper PA-28

The Piper PA-28 Cherokee is a family of light aircraft designed for flight training, air taxi and personal use, built by Piper Aircraft.

All members of the PA-28 family are all-metal, unpressurized, four-seat, single-engine piston-powered airplanes with low-mounted wings and tricycle landing gear. All PA-28 aircraft have a single door on the co-pilot side, which is entered by stepping on the wing.

The first PA-28 received its type certificate from the FAA in 1960 and the series remains in production in 2009. Current models are the Arrow and Warrior III. The Archer was discontinued in 2009, but with investment from new Piper owners Imprimis, will be revived in 2010.

Competition for the PA-28 series include the Cessna 172, the Grumman American AA-5 series and the Beechcraft Musketeer.

Piper has created variations within the Cherokee family by installing engines ranging from 140 to 300 hp (105-220 kW), providing turbocharging, offering fixed or retractable landing gear, fixed-pitch or constant speed propellers, and stretching the fuselage to accommodate 6 people. The larger, six-seat variant of the PA-28 is generally the PA-32; earlier versions were known as the "Cherokee Six," and a PA-32 version is still in production today under the model name Saratoga.

General characteristics

  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: three passengers
  • Length: 23.3 feet (7.16 m)
  • Wingspan: 30.0 feet (9.2 m)
  • Height: 7.3 feet (2.25 m)
  • Wing area: 160 sq ft (15.14 m²)
  • Airfoil: NACA 652-415
  • Empty weight: 1201 lb (544 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 2150 lb (975 kg)
  • Useful load: 949 lb (430 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 2150 lb (975 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Lycoming O-320-E2A Sensenich M74DM, 150 hp (113 kW)
  • Propeller diameter: 74 inches (1.9 m)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 123 knots (142 mph, 230 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 108 knots (124 mph (200 km/h), 201 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 47 knots (54 mph, 87 km/h)
  • Range: 465 nm (535 sm, 867 km)
  • Service ceiling: 14,300 feet (4400 m)
  • Rate of climb: 660 ft/min (3.4 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 13.4 lb/sq ft (64.4 kg/sq m)
  • Power/mass: 14.3 lb/hp (0.116 kW/kg)

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Piper PA-32

Piper PA-32

The Piper PA-32 Cherokee Six is a series of six or seven seat, fixed or retractable landing gear, light aircraft, that was manufactured in the United States by Piper Aircraft between 1965 and 2007.

The PA-32 series began life in 1965 as the 260 horsepower (190 kW) PA32-260 Cherokee Six, a significantly modified six (or seven) seat development of the PA-28 Cherokee.

The Cherokee Six and its successors feature a baggage compartment in the nose between the cockpit and the engine compartment as well as a large double door in the back for easy loading of passengers and cargo.

General characteristics

  • Crew: One
  • Capacity: five passengers (or six with optional seat)
  • Length: 27.7 ft in (8.4 m)
  • Wingspan: 32.8 ft in (10.0 m)
  • Height: 7.9 ft in (2.4 m)
  • Wing area: 174.5 ft² (16.5 m²)
  • Wing profile: NACA 65-415
  • Empty weight: 1788 lb (811 kg)
  • Gross weight: 3400 lb (1542 kg)
  • Powerplant: One × Lycoming IO-540-K1A5, 300 hp (225 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 174 mph (280 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 168 mph (272 km/h)
  • Range: 840 miles (1361 km)
  • Service ceiling: 16250 ft (4950 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1050 ft/min (5.3 m/s)

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Piper J-3

Piper J-3 Cub

The Piper J-3 Cub is a small, simple, light aircraft that was built between 1937 and 1947 by Piper Aircraft. With tandem (fore and aft) seating, it was intended for flight training but became one of the most popular and best-known light aircraft of all time. The Cub's simplicity, affordability and popularity invokes comparisons to the Ford Model T automobile.

The aircraft's standard yellow paint has come to be known as “Cub Yellow” or "Lock Haven Yellow".

General characteristics

  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: one passenger
  • Length: 22 ft 5 in (6.83 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 3 in (10.74 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
  • Wing area: 178.5 ft² (16.58 m²)
  • Empty weight: 765 lb (345 kg)
  • Useful load: 455 lb (205 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,220 lb (550 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Continental A-65-8 air-cooled flat four, 65 hp (48 kW) at 2,350 rpm

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 76 kn (87 mph, 140 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 65 kn (75 mph, 121 km/h)
  • Range: 191 NM (220 mi, 354 km)
  • Service ceiling: 11,500 ft (3,500 m)
  • Rate of climb: 450 ft/min (2.3 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 6.84 lb/ft² (33.4 kg/m²)
  • Power/mass: 18.75 lb/hp (11.35 kg/kW)

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Piper PA-11

Piper PA-11

The airframe is basically the same as a J-3, however, the engine mount is slightly lower, the windshield more sloped, the cowling is fully closed and the fuel tank was raised and placed in the port wing.[2] Both seats were slightly moved back, and solo flying was usually from the front seat. Early PA-11s had a Continental A65-8 engine, while the later ones had the option of a Continental C90-8.

Several current-production light-sport aircraft are being produced based on this configuration. On the early PA-11s, the fuselage was painted with a metallic blue on the lower half the rest being Lock Haven Yellow. The later PA-11s were all yellow with a simple brown stripe.

The aircraft formed the basis for the next evolution in the Piper Cub series: The Piper PA-18 Super Cub. The PA-11 and its successor, the PA-18-95, share many common traits. With a gross weight of 1,220 lbs. and average empty weight of 850 lbs., the PA-11 is a light enough to perform well, yet heavy enough to maneuver easily in more wind than the lighter J-3 Cub. The PA-11 is capable of short takeoffs and landings, yet has a respectable cruise speed for its configuration. Given that the PA-11 falls into the modern day category of light sport aircraft it is a popular airplane to acquire and commands a premium price.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Payload: 470 lbs (213 kg)
  • Length: 35 ft 2 in (10.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 22 ft 4 in (6.8 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
  • Empty weight: 750 lb (340 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,220 lb (553 kg)
  • Useful load: 470 lb (213 kg)
  • Powerplant: × 1 Continental C90-8, 90 hp (67 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 112 mph (181 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 100 mph (162 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 40 mph (65 km/h)
  • Range: 350 miles (567 km)
  • Service ceiling: 16,000 ft (4880 m)

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The above content is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article Piper PA-11; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.



Piper PA-15

Piper PA-15

The Piper PA-15 Vagabond and PA-17 Vagabond are both two seat, high wing, conventional gear light aircraft that were designed for personal use and for flight training and built by Piper Aircraft starting in 1948.

The PA-15 was the first post-World War II Piper aircraft design. It utilized much of the same production tooling that created the famous Piper Cub, as well as many of the Cub structural components (tail surfaces, landing gear, most of the wing parts). The Vagabond has a wing that is one bay shorter (~30 feet versus 36 feet) than that on the Cub, which lead to the unofficial designation of Short-wing Piper. This allowed the aircraft to be built with minimal material, design and development costs, and is credited with saving Piper Aircraft from bankruptcy after the war.

Vagabonds used a new fuselage with side-by-side seating for two instead of the Cubs' tandem (fore and aft) seating.

The PA-17 Vagabond version features dual controls, enabling it to be used for pilot training. It has a bungee cord shock-absorbed undercarriage (solid gear on the PA-15), and a 65 hp Continental A-65 engine.

General characteristics

  • Crew: two in side-by-side seating
  • Length: 18 ft 8 in (5.69 m)
  • Wingspan: 29 ft 3 in (8.92 m)
  • Empty weight: 620 lb (281 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1100 lb (498 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Lycoming O-145, 65 hp (49 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 100 mph (163 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 90 mph (146 km/h)
  • Range: 250 miles (405 km)
  • Service ceiling: 10,000 ft (3077 m)
  • Rate of climb: 510 ft/min (2.6 m/s)

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Piper PA-18

Piper PA-18

The Piper PA-18 Super Cub is a two-seat, single-engine monoplane. Introduced in 1949 by Piper Aircraft, it was developed from the Piper PA-11, and traces its lineage back through the J-3 to the Taylor E-2 Cub of the 1930's. In close to 40 years of production, over 9,000 were built. Super Cubs are commonly found in roles such as bush flying, banner and glider towing.

While based on the design of the earlier Cubs, the addition of an electrical system, flaps (3 notches), and a vastly more powerful engine (150hp), make it a very different flying experience. Although the "standard" Super Cub was fitted with a 150 horsepower (112 kW) Lycoming engine, it was not uncommon to see them equipped with a 180 hp (134 kW) powerplant. The high-lift wing and powerful engine made the Super Cub a prime candidate for conversion to either floatplane or skiplane. In addition, the PA-18A (an agricultural version) was produced for applying either dry chemical or liquid spray.

The Super Cub retained the basic "rag and tube" (fabric stretched over a steel tube frame) structure of the earlier J-3 Cub.

The first true "Super" Cubs had flaps, dual fuel tanks, and an O-235 Lycoming engine producing about 108 hp (115 hp for takeoff only). However, a 90 hp Continental without flaps and an optional second wing tank was available. Their empty weight was, on the average, 800-1000 pounds with a gross weight of 1,500 lb. These Cubs would take off in about 400 feet (at gross weight) and land in about 300 feet (thanks to the flaps). The Super Cub is renowned for its ability to take off and land in very short distances. With a light wing loading some can take off in 50 feet and land in 30. The O-290 Lycoming powered Cubs (135 hp) followed and would take off in about 200 feet. The landing distance remained the same at about 400 feet, or 300 feet using flaps. With the use of the Lycoming O-320 at 150-160 hp, the Cub's allowable gross weight increased to 1,750 lb while retaining the capability of a mere 200 feet for takeoff.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 2
  • Length: 22 ft 7 in (6.88 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 3 in (10.74 m)
  • Height: ()
  • Empty weight: 983 lb (446 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1750 lb (794 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1× Lycoming O-320 flat four, 160 hp (112 kW)

Performance

  • Cruise speed: 100 kts (112 mph, 180 km/h)
  • Range: 400 nmi450 with extra tank (460 mi, 740 km)
  • Service ceiling: 19,000 ft (5,800 m)
  • Rate of climb: 960 ft/min ()

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The above content is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article Piper PA-18; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.