Aeronca Aircraft | Basic Aircraft Products

Aeronca Aircraft

Basic Aircraft Products has the BPE-14 turbo alternator available for Aeronca Aircrafts. We currently have models available to the Aeronca 7 Champion (7AC / 7BC) & Aeronca 11 Chief (11AC / 11BC). For more information on the Aeronca Aircrafts please use the links below.

Aeronca 7 Champion (7AC / 7BC) | Aeronca 11 Chief (11AC / 11BC)


Aeronca 7 Champion (7AC / 7BC)

Aeronca 7 Champion AC

The Aeronca Model 7 Champion, more commonly known as the Champ, is a single-engine, two-seat, fixed conventional gear airplane. Designed for flight training and personal use, it entered production in the United States in 1945.

Like the Piper Cub with which it competed, the Champ features tandem seating. While the J-3 model of the Cub is soloed from the rear seat, the Champ can be soloed from the front, giving improved forward visibility on the ground and during takeoffs, landings, and climbs. The Champ has a wider cabin than the Cub and offers better visibility.

As with many light aircraft of the time, the Champs fuselage and tail surfaces are constructed of welded metal tubing. The outer shape of the fuselage is created by a combination of wooden formers and longerons, covered with fabric. The cross-section of the metal fuselage truss is triangular, a design feature which can be traced all the way back to the earliest Aeronca C-2 design of the late 1920s.

Aeronca 7 Champion BC

The strut-braced wings of the Champ are, like the fuselage and tail surfaces, fabric covered, utilizing aluminum ribs. Most Champs were built with wooden spars. American Champion has been using aluminum spars in the aircraft it has produced and has, as well, made the aluminum-spar wings available for retrofit installation on older aircraft.

The landing gear of most Champs is in a conventional arrangement, though a model with tricycle gear was produced, and a model with reversed tricycle gear was tried. Conventional-gear Champs feature a steerable tailwheel and most have steel tube main gear which use an oleo strut for shock absorption; one variant utilized spring steel main gear, and American Champion is using aluminum gear legs in its production model of the Champ. The tricycle-gear Champs use the steel tube and oleo strut main gear, mating these with an oleo strut nose gear.

Models 7AC, 7CCM, 7DC, and 7EC were approved as seaplanes, with the addition of floats and vertical stabilizer fins; the seaplane versions were designated the S7AC, S7CCM, S7DC, and S7EC, respectively. Float and supplemental fin installations are also approved for models 7ECA, 7GC, 7GCB, 7GCBC, and properly modified 7HC's.

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1, pilot
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Length: 21 ft 6 in (6.7 m)
  • Wingspan: 35 ft 2 in (10.7 m)
  • Height: 7 ft (2.3 m)
  • Wing area: 170 ft (15.8 m)
  • Empty weight: 740 lb (325 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,220 lb (533 kg)
  • Powerplant: Continental A65-8 piston engine, 65 hp (50 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 100 mph (160 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 85 mph (137 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 38 mph (62 km/h)
  • Range: 460 miles (740 km)
  • Service ceiling: 12,400 ft (4,100 m)
  • Rate of climb: 370 ft/min (1.8 m/s)Fuel burn rate: 4.0--4.5 gph

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The above content is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article Aeronca Champion; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.



Aeronca 11 Chief (11AC / 11BC)

Aeronca 11 Chief AC

The Aeronca Chief is a single-engine, two-seat, light aircraft with fixed conventional landing gear, which entered production in the United States in 1945.

Designed for flight training and personal use, the Chief was produced in the United States between 1946 and 1950. The Chief was known as a basic gentle flyer with good manners, intended as a step up from the 7AC Champion which was designed for flight training.

Like many classic airplanes, it has a significant adverse yaw, powerful rudder and sensitive elevator controls. It had a well appointed cabin, with flocked taupe sidewalls and a zebra wood grain instrument panel. There was never a flight manual produced for the 11AC or 7AC series airplanes, as a simple placard system was deemed enough to keep a pilot out of trouble.

The 11AC Chief entered production at Aeronca in early 1946, with upgraded versions introduced as the 11BC (also called the "Chief") and 11CC "Super Chief," in June 1947 and 1948, respectively. Aeronca was at the time headquartered at Middletown, Ohio, but production facilities there were heavily utilized with the 7AC Champion line; because of this, the model 11 aircraft were assembled at the Dayton Municipal Airport in Vandalia, Ohio. While the Vandalia location was first used only for the assembly of parts fabricated at Middletown, activities there later expanded to include some fabrication work. Only later, toward the end of production did the Chief line return to Middletown.

Aeronca ceased all production of light aircraft in 1951. Production of the Chief, which had been outsold by its sibling the Champ by a margin of nearly 4 to 1, had already ended by 1950, with only a few planes produced in 1948-1949. This marked the last time the Chief design was built in the United States.

General characteristics

  • Crew: one pilot
  • Capacity: one passenger
  • Length: 20 ft 10 in (6.4 m)
  • Wingspan: 36 ft 0 in (11 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 10 in (2.1 m)
  • Wing area: 175.5 ft (16.3 m)
  • Airfoil: NACA 4412
  • Empty weight: 725 lb (328.9 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 1,250 lb (567 kg)
  • Useful load: 525 lb (238.1 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 1,250 lb (567 kg)
  • Powerplant: 1 Continental A-65-8, 65 hp (48.5 kW)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 105 mph (169 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 95 mph (152.9 km/h)
  • Stall speed: 40 mph (64.4 km/h)
  • Range: 330 mi/550 mi with aux fuel tank (531.1 km)
  • Service ceiling: 10,800 ft (3291.9 m)
  • Rate of climb: 500 ft/min (2.54 m/s)
  • Wing loading: 7.1 lb/ft (34.8 kg/m)
  • Power/mass: 19.2 lb/hp (11.7 kg/kW)

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The above content is based on the copyrighted Wikipedia article Aeronca 11 Chief; it is used under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License (CC-BY-SA). You may redistribute it, verbatim or modified, providing that you comply with the terms of the CC-BY-SA.